Adult Acne: Which Product Option Is Right for You?

Adult Acne: Which Product Option Is Right for You?

Written by Margarita Lolis, MD
on Monday, 13 November 2017

There are so many acne and breakout busting treatments on the market. It’s common to get a feeling of product overload. 

Dr. Magarita Lolis -- Board-Certified Dermatologist in northern New Jersey who takes a holistic approach to treating skincare issues -- breaks down the list of common products to consider using with the benefits of each. Hopefully this menu of options will clear some confusion.
How to Avoid Burnout When Caring for Your Special Needs Child

How to Avoid Burnout When Caring for Your Special Needs Child

Written by Debby Bitticks
on Monday, 13 November 2017

Parenting is challenging, but parenting a child with special needs brings the experience to a whole new level that no one can really understand until they live it. 

From one day to the next, parents with special needs children can never really predict what the next day will bring. Will it require another trip to the doctor for another unforeseen and confusing medical issue? Will a certain behavior become so unmanageable that it impedes the ability for the child to get to school that day? Will you be on the phone with the school again for another challenging issue to sort through? 

Even with all the challenges our special needs children present, we love and care about them deeply, but how do we as parents keep a positive outlook and not succumb to burning out?
Kids & Tummy Aches: How to Tell the Difference Between IBD & IBS

Kids & Tummy Aches: How to Tell the Difference Between IBD & IBS

Written by Kenneth Grant, MD
on Monday, 13 November 2017

It’s normal for kids to get stomach aches, but some kids have bad stomach pain all the time. 

If your child has abdominal pain, cramping, gas, bloating, diarrhea or constipation, you may be wondering if your child has inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but do you know the difference?

While many of the symptoms are similar, IBD and IBS are very different. IBS can cause pain, but there is no inflammation of the intestine and it doesn’t lead to serious disease, as with IBD. 

It’s important to not diagnose either of these conditions yourself. If your child has these symptoms, you should take your child to a pediatrician, who can then refer your child to a pediatric gastroenterologist, if necessary.
The Road to Victories Team: A Living Definition of Endurance & Survival

The Road to Victories Team: A Living Definition of Endurance & Survival

Written by Mike Dreyer
on Monday, 13 November 2017

When you hear the word “endure,” what do you think? 

Undergoing hardships and persevering may come to mind. Or to some, it could be a cross-country trip, especially if by train, bus or car, and for a fun added challenge, add kids and remove WiFi. 

Now, how about a cross-country trip by bike? Two wheels under human power exposed to all the elements and conditions. 

For six people on the Road to Victories cycling team –- Marty Perlmutter, Darrell Rose, Michael Morales, Mike Grant, Robert Goodheart, and Chuck Wakefield –- this adventure is real.
5 Must Do’s When Traveling with a Child Who Has Epilepsy

5 Must Do’s When Traveling with a Child Who Has Epilepsy

Written by Mary L. Zupanc, MD
on Monday, 13 November 2017

The busy holiday travel season is upon us, bringing millions of Americans to the roads and skies, along with delays, flat tires and other travel snags.

Indeed, traveling can be stressful -- and particularly so for children with a complex medical condition like epilepsy. 

But, the good news is that taking a few precautions beforehand can help smooth the process for these young jet-setters.

Here are five must do’s when traveling with a child who has epilepsy.
It’s a No-Brainer: Omega-3s Are Essential for Developing Brains

It’s a No-Brainer: Omega-3s Are Essential for Developing Brains

Written by Rima Kleiner, MS, RD, LDN
on Saturday, 11 November 2017

The good news? Women can--and should--continue to enjoy tuna sandwiches during pregnancy. Decades of research show the benefits of omega-3s on developing brains when pregnant and breastfeeding women regularly consume a variety of seafood. 

The bad news? Many women are confused about how much seafood is safe to eat when they’re expecting or breastfeeding, or even how much seafood is safe to feed their toddlers and infants starting solids.

The fact is that omega-3 fatty acids—along with other nutrients like calcium, vitamin D, protein and iron—found in seafood are vital during pregnancy, breastfeeding and early childhood, and because of this, the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that expectant and breastfeeding moms and young children consume at least two weekly servings of seafood. 

Unfortunately, pregnant women in the U.S. consume less than one-quarter (only about 1.9 ounces) of the recommended amount of seafood each week.

Here are five things to keep in mind when considering seafood during these critical development periods.
4 Stroke-Savvy Strategies to Stop the Silence

4 Stroke-Savvy Strategies to Stop the Silence

Written by Ken Redcross, MD
on Friday, 03 November 2017

There are a lot of misconceptions when it comes to strokes, especially silent strokes. 

Many people think strokes only happen to older people, that they happen in the heart, and that there is no prevention or treatment. Despite “stroke awareness” on the basic risk factors and symptoms, the reality for many Americans is that occurrences of strokes continue to climb. 

According to research, approximately 12 million strokes occur every year, and 11 million of those are silent strokes. This means 11 million people are having strokes and most likely don’t even know it!

Eighty percent of strokes are actually preventable, but it’s the silent strokes we really need to be more aware of in terms of preventing damage to the brain, which can ultimately lead to debilitating diseases like dementia.
Is It Something I Ate or Lack of DAO?

Is It Something I Ate or Lack of DAO?

Written by Sherry Torkos, BScPhm, RPh
on Friday, 03 November 2017

Have you ever had stomach cramps, headache, nausea and flushing after a meal and wondered, "Is it something I ate?"

Sensitivities or reactions to food are increasingly common. They can be challenging to deal with, because they can cause a wide range of physical and emotional symptoms that are often difficult to pinpoint. 

The two main types of food reactions are allergies and intolerances. Food allergies involve an immune system reaction to a particular food or component of food, such as the protein in peanuts, eggs or dairy. The immune system reacts inappropriately when faced with the food allergen and mounts a reaction, which can range from minor rash or hives to life threatening anaphylaxis.
Put the News on Snooze & Shift Doom to Hope

Put the News on Snooze & Shift Doom to Hope

Written by Sanam Hafeez, PsyD
on Wednesday, 25 October 2017

Overloaded on bad news? You're not alone. 

When we tune in to see what's going on, all we see is suffering from natural disasters, shootings, terror attacks, reports about economic uncertainty and a divided political climate, plus celebrity deaths and just mean people being mean.

We hear about a tragedy or disaster and we become glued to our TV’s and news feeds, growing more and more anxious as rapid updates flow in.

While it is important to be informed, being a “news junkie” can be very damaging.
Is It Really Our Job to Save the Addict?

Is It Really Our Job to Save the Addict?

Written by Marianne Clyde, LMFT
on Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Drug addiction is a huge problem in our society. But, is it really our job to "save" the addict?

I don’t necessarily think the conversation should focus on whether or not it’s a choice, or whether or not society is co-dependent, but rather what we can agree on.

We may not be able to save every person who struggles with substance abuse, but we can at least do what we can to lessen availability and move in a healthier direction.
Go with Your Gut: 7 Foods to Eat for Better Skin, Hair & Mood

Go with Your Gut: 7 Foods to Eat for Better Skin, Hair & Mood

Written by Dr. Christopher Calapai, DO
on Saturday, 07 October 2017

All symptoms of the body from thin, dull hair, and sallow skin, to acne breakouts, body aches and sluggish energy all point to the gut. 

Gut health is incredibly important making mindful eating an essential part of longevity and anti-aging.

If you want to feel vibrant and maintain a youthful appearance up to 15 years younger than your actual age, start weaving these key foods into your diet.
5 Life Triggers that Inspire Bold Beauty Transformations

5 Life Triggers that Inspire Bold Beauty Transformations

Written by Sanam Hafeez, PsyD
on Tuesday, 03 October 2017

It's common for women to alter their appearance when faced with a significant life challenge. 

When we are tested we transform. When we shift our mindset, and transform on the inside, it’s only natural that we want the outside to change as well. 

It’s as if we shed old skin like a butterfly ready to take new flight soaring to new heights. 

Read on for some common life challenges and the typical beauty treatments sought for each.
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